History of Vienna Streets

Vienna boasts of a rich culture and history. Up to now, it still has beautiful historical buildings in place that have been brought back to their former glory. 

The Austrian capital’s streets and squares also date back to the olden days and many were named after the city’s notable personalities. In fact, historians spent two years studying the biographies of famous people in Vienna who have agreed to use their names for the city’s streets. Their research found 120 names to be most controversial. 

Maria-Theresian-Platz

This is a large square in the city center and a popular tourist attraction. Build in 1819, it is located next to Ringstrasse and the Museum of Modern Arts. 

Two museums are situated in the square – the Natural History Museum and the Art History Museum. Additionally, it is here where the large statue of Empress Marie-Theresa of Austro-Hungaria can be found. 

Heldenplatz 

Heldenplatz literally means Heroes’ Square, one of the most well known historical sites of Vienna. It is bordered by the Leopoldinian Tract of the Hofburg in the northern seciton, the Neue Hofburg in the south and the Ringstrasse in the south-western part. The north-western section provides a great view of the Burgtheater, the Parliament and Rathaus. 

Also in the area are the equestrian statues of Prince Eugene of Savoy and Archduke Charles of Austria. 

Several historical events took place in this street. One of them was the 1938 announcement of Hitler of the Anschluss of Austria to the German Reich. 

Ballhausplatz 

Located in the Innere Stadt on the edge of the Hofburg Imperial Palace’s grounds, this square was built in 1754. It was named as such as there used to be a tennis house or ballhaus during the reign of Ferdinand I. The tennis house was later used as the Imperial Court construction office. The Imperial hospital used to be on this site as well. 

Also in the area is a building which has been made as the office of the Chancellor of Austria the reason why Ballhausplatz is often referred to as the house of the Austrian Federal Chancellery. 

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